From Laid Off To Six Figure Supermom With Lain Ehmann – FA166

lain-ehmann-spoon

Do What You Love and Love What You Do…

For the penultimate show of our women in entrepreneurship series, regular guest Lain Ehmann returns to the Foolish Adventure Show to give us a little more about who she is and her incredible journey.

Lain is a former journalist who left her career behind to pursue something which she loved. Within three years she has transformed her life and turned her passion of scrapbooking in to a six-figure business. What’s more, she’s managed to pull it all off while raising three kids and releasing several books.

From this episode, you’ll get some amazing tips on how to make a solid income from something that you truly love doing. Listen in as Lain shares her secrets on business preparation, execution and how to avoid turning your favorite hobby in to your worst nightmare.

Ignite Your Passion…

  • Finding your unfair advantage.
  • Domain expertise and getting a leg up.
  • Finding and utilising your ‘secret sauce’.
  • Doing what your competitors won’t do.
  • Getting the most out of a partnership.

Links

Enjoy Your Foolish Adventure.

From Laid Off To Six Figure Supermom With Lain Ehmann – FA166
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Women Entrepreneurs Series

1. Manufacturing For E-Commerce With Miracle Wanzo – FA163
2. A Mother’s Entrepreneurship Journey To Eventual Millionaire – FA164
3. Building An Infoproduct And Software Empire With Amy Hoy – FA165
4. From Laid Off To Six Figure Supermom With Lain Ehmann – FA166
5. Using Techstars To Accelerate Success With Erica Douglass – FA167


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  • So – here’s a question for you Lain and Tim. Can you actually run a business without it running your life?

    I seems like everyone is saying it can’t be a part time thing. So I wonder if I’m fighting a losing battle to keep my hours down.

    You are both so inspiring and I know you value family too so I’d appreciate a few words of wisdom on this.

  • Lain Ehmann

    I think it depends on your own personal preferences. I happen to adore my business. I love working. So the time I spend at work is not a burden to me at all. My options were to have a full-time office job, or make my personal business a success with the same level of income I get from an office job. a job that pays the amounts of celery I received from my personal business would be 50 or 60 hour a week office job. I do not work 50 to 60 hours a week, so in my mind, I’m working less than I would in office. I also have the benefit of being able to leave in the middle of the day to attend sporting events’s, or take a week off to travel with my son’s baseball team. There are trade-offs, though. I don’t have a lot of other hobbies. I don’t have a lot of friends I see on a regular basis. My priorities are my family and my work. Could I worked last? Yes, but I would make.

    • Lain Ehmann

      Lips, darn AutoCorrect! That was supposed to say, “could I work less? Yes, but I’d make less.”

    • Lain Ehmann

      Oh my goodness. I’m trying to do this from my phone, using Siri. I cannot see my whole comment at once to review and edit it. Sorry about that! I said celery, it was supposed to be salary.
      Lol

    • Thanks Lain. I love working too – which is the problem 🙂

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  • Dave B

    Too bad she is too cheap to think a piano teacher shouldn’t be able to make a living.

  • Andrew Pfaff

    I’m exposing Lain Ehmann’s article on music teachers for public ridicule. This woman has completely disrespected our profession. I could lay into her about how much her “scrapbooking” could possibly be worth, but I’m above that.

  • Concerned teacher

    Hi there! Read your ignorant and insulting article on music teachers! Guess what sweetheart?!? I am a private lesson teacher with a college degree. I’m also a teacher in public school district. I’m also a professional performing musician. I do not make six figures like you claim I would with my private students! I teach out of my home, after school about 3 days out of the week. Your article on music as a waste of money is insulting and ridiculous. You’re forgetting that private music teachers do NOT receive healthcare or benefits. Oh by the way-your annual salary calculations are based on a 40 hour work week. Are you really that stupid or just I’ll-informed that you would assume that a private teacher is teaching THAT many students, and that every single student actually shows up every week? My students cancel often especially around summertime when vacations come up! Oh guess what! I charge $20 for a 30 minute lesson! So you can understand how people like me would be insulted by your claim to know it ALL about private instructing! Every private teacher’s story and situation is different so think twice before you make a generalization about a profession that you have done almost no research on. Thank you SO much for helping to aid in the destruction of music programs all over the country.

  • Trolls, before YOU comment on this interview you should know you’re mad about an article written by Lain nearly 5 years ago. My site isn’t a place for you to hate on her. Hate on her at the site where the dude wrote about this old post of hers.

    Lastly, I will delete your comment as soon as I see it. I do this not because I don’t think you should hate on someone, but because I just don’t like people coming to MY site and crapping all over it.

    It’s okay that you’re mad, but take it to a more appropriate site.

  • lorin

    Hi Lain, I am hoping that your article about parents, kids and piano lessons, was
    lapse, and the ignorance and lack of knowledge a piece of poor judgement. Do you have any idea what it takes to be a professional musician? Years of study, years of showcasing your talent, years of being treated poorly by club owners, years of barely being able to pay your bills and having no health insurance. A true musician spends years of practicing,learning, showcasing, working for free to get “exposure”. Perhaps too many episodes of Amerrican Idol have brainwashed and made the public believe that one can become a star overnight. It doesn’t happen that way. Making music of any sort takes years to perfect.Piano is a difficult instrument to teach. Most teachers have classical training.hmm how did that happen? Many teach to bring the gift of music to children. Do you honestly think $60 an hour is too much to pay for the enrichment of your childs life? How much is the soccer uniform,the tennis racket, the baseball equipment ? Is one more important then the other.Most teachers adjust the rates, $30 for a beginner, and often give more then 30 minutes or an hour without charging for the love of it!! What do you pay that electrician ? The gardener? have you ever paid time and a half for a visit from the appliance repairman. They charge $79 before they even do anything..just to walk in your house ask your dentist what he charges per minute. You need an education, but you’ll probably never be able to play the piano..Scrapbooking?